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the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you had a terrible case of a cancer patient in acute pain, and your diagnosis was, the person is experiencing a pain crisis. it wouldn't be useful. debt is a symptom of 2008, to be precise. it is what happens when a financial implosion begins on wall street, and then all sorts of dark forces break out, break loose, and they start dismantling the economic and social fabric of the world. these awful events happen once every hundred years
out their vote and is going to be exploited by virtually every merchandiser in america. >> obama's campaign manager and the rest of the team for the ground game they pulled together which the romney team laughed at first. they are not laughing now. >> mark. >> thank you. magnificent. >> is this it? >> let's see what conac has given us. the biggest winner of 2012 vladimir putin. he overcame massive opposition protests, maneuvered through constitutional loopholes, served as president, then prime minister. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candid
. >>> when we come back on squawk, bank of america ceo brian moynihan in his own words, we caught up with him yesterday to talk about business, the economy and the looming figure. as we head into a break, bank of america, best performing dow component of the year. up about 77%. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? indicated up 14 points. unable to hold on to the gains we saw yesterday
of america. every time you come to this floor it's a question, why are we here? we are here to do the people's work. let's sit down. get it done. and move forward. instead of filling the agenda however worthy some of those initiatives may be, instead of not along with passing a middle income tax -- this is also reminiscent of a year ago. the president proposed, the house and senate, democrats and republicans, voted for the payroll tax holiday. the republicans in the house resisted. painted themselves into a corner until they had no choice. the issue had been made too hot for them to handle and they finally had to come around to supporting the payroll tax holiday. and here we are again. 100% of the american people will receive a tax cut when we pass the middle income tax cut. the wealthiest people in our country will receive a tax cut up to their income of $250,000. we are asking them to pay a little bit more for what they make over $250,000 a year. to help reduce the deficit, to help grow the economy, grow the economy. that growth is what is essential. you want to reduce the deficit, create
that was and the challenges facing us in 2013. first to our big stories of 2012. and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the reelection of president barack obama. and politics headed in a decidedly liberal direction, so what happened and what does it mean for the country going forward. joining us columnist and detail editor, dani henninger and kim strassel. dan, we like to say for a long time we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and
are kind of methadone clinic. we'll reenact the two percent . part of the bargain let's get america off of a far more dangerous drug than corn or ethanoyl. it hurts food shoppers and tears up the inside of the engine. >> two wrongs don't make a right. what john was referring to was windmills in places like norway. >> and holland. >> and what is happening the wind sector took off in norway and in denmark. at the same time gerald ford and carter were pushing shell gas development. >> and that was viable. >> and that is 50 percent of what is going on in wind energy and equals the price . you net out 15 percent of the oil. are we making these companies economically profitable or if not. they should be killed off and otherwise we are padding the profits. morgan, you still like solar and what about wind. >> the price of that is coming down. wind energy let is it lapse and slash and born corn sib sidies. going back to wind. it is 8,000 percent higher than the cost of natural gas for the same amount of electrical lout put. >> i agree with her on this. >> what is more interesting is what liz sai
. the hair on the back of my neck stood up, and i thought, there is no way that in america that this could happen. and i spoke out at that time, "you can't do that to us." and then he said, "yes, i can." i said, "that's not legal." and he came back with, "yes, it is." >> and it was. in the state of michigan, there is no law that prevents a boss from firing people virtually at will. at weyco, that meant no smoking at work, no smoking at home, no smoking period. >> good afternoon. weyco. >> weyco gave employees 15 months to quit, then they were subject to random nicotine testing. you fail, you're out. >> did either of you say, "okay, this is awful, but, you know, this is a chance to break the habit?" >> i did. i tried to quit smoking. i took advantage of their program, the smoking cessation program. but i was unsuccessful. >> i'm trying every way to cut down, quit--gum. i'm trying, yes, on my own, but i don't need an employer to do that. >> i pay the bills around here, so i'm gonna set the expectations. >> howard weyers is the boss, some would say tyrant, of weyco. >> what's important? this
visit booktv.org. >> author jon meacham recount it is career of america's third president d recounts the career of america's third president, thomas jefferson. he reports that despite his strong beliefs and opposition to confrontation, president jefferson was able so successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennesse
countries is stamped "made in america" and that's something to be proud of. something to be proud of. [cheers and applause] by the way, i hope the camera folks had a chance to take a look at some of the connects including that flag made out of connects and joe biden was in costco, he wanted to buy some of this stuff but i told him he had too much work to do. i wasn't going to have him building rollercoasters all day long. of course, santa delivers everywhere. i have been keeping my own naughty and nice list for washington. so you should keep your eye on who gets some connects this year. they're going to be some members of congress who get them and some who don't. [applause] this is a wonderful time of year. it's been a few weeks since a long election finally came to an end and obviously i couldn't be more honored to be back in the white house, but i'm already missing the time that i spent on the campaign visiting towns like this and talking to folks like you. >> we love you! >> i love you back. [cheers and applause] the benefits of traveling and getting out of the white house is it g
successful at cost control and private insurers have been, the great thing about america is we have everything, all possible assistance here. the veterans health administration which is true socialized medicine, the doctors are government employees, is incredibly efficient relative to the rest of the health-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signa
proprietary not in a bad way that in a quite paternal because they cared about the definition of america and the survival and success of america. they did that what drove jefferson this case is the fear that would be swallowed up as a free of the revolution virtually in the world had been by the forces of reaction. i argue in the book that it's impossible life and to understand early american history without seeing the period between the end of the french and indian war and 7063 and the end of the war in 1815 as a 50 year war with britain sometimes hot and sometimes cold but always there. in precise analogy but it would be writing about washington, adams, jefferson, hamilton without reference to this struggle. i think would be like riding but truman, eisenhower, kennedy, johnson, nixon, ford, carter, ronald reagan and not mentioning the soviet union. the foreign policy was that significant and his domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is that they did. so you win the argument. the war of 1812
.01%, it amounted to about 4.2 million per family. so when you think about why is there this polarization in america, why are there these very different views about the world, you know, part of it is there are very different worlds that people are inhabits. having said that, so, you know, my premise is this isn't just a case of the rich have always been with us. something really different is happening, and it's important for us to talk about it, to research it, to figure out what's going on. but actually, there is a real reluctance, and i have admit particularly here in america, and i'm canadian, so i see you guys with a little bit of a distance. [laughter] particularly in america there is a reluctance to talk about these issues of income distribution. and one of my friends who was supposed to be here tonight, i talked to him about this, and he said that it's -- i'm going to quote him because it was such a nice line. so he said: i was once told by the head of a prestigious think tank in washington, d.c. that the think tank's board was very unlikely to fund any work that had income or wealth inequali
-term investments here. at the same time, we do not start of what has been so much a part of america's -- do not starve so much of what has been a part of america's history, our willingness to invest in the future, and that includes children, poor children, modern infrastructure, basic and blue sky research. when we get beyond the challenge we face over these next few weeks, i think that is going to be a broader challenge we face over the next decade. >> i think we have time for one more question. over here. as the question is coming, i want to say how much we support the president in this fight on ensuring the balance, and the president has been very strong on that issue. >> richard singer. we are a biomedical company that helps nurses and doctors, may collaborate better with social media. we got a small amount of the innovation funding, but it is a broader question about the health care ecosystem. if the company goes under, all the software engineers get new jobs in a matter of weeks. but in biotech, we have a lot of people with ph.d.s, longer-term and specialized types of areas, and we do
. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually rarely put pen to paper himself. so what is the significance of this typewriter you have in the exhi business. >> are you absolutely write. churchill favorite method of working was by dictation. and this is what was then a state of the art silence typewrite
, the america the peopley a significant majority, the problem is a spinning problem. but not ex blessively a spending problem. they have come up with comprehensive plans that rely on spending reductions than tax increasing overtime, they achieve the spending reduction through comprehensive social security reforms and tax reforms, to get the revenues that is the pathway forward. and but again, i think we have to be realistic, we don't have a lot of time left. let'focus on what we need, avoid fiscal cliff, a credible down payment in regard to revenues and spending, it has to have a more spending element than we see right now. and targets, spending in revenues to achieve a grand bash an next year. neil: thank you very much, wall street is giving up. dow futures off almost 300 points, if you are getting a sense of de. deja vu you are not alone. remember when they rejected tarp 1, it was shot down, and stocks went way down, the dow tumbling better than 770, congress quickly reconvened, took out there are tarp vote to avoid door dow fall off, it was thought it safi the day, what happened, the do
the coast of maine, remote and solitary, held special meaning for one of america's greatest artists. in a letter to his brother, winslow homer said of his surroundings, "there is certainly some strange power "that has an overlook on me, directing my life. "that i am in the right place, there is no doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting thelace where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who co
're great. you don't believe it? let's make it happen. >> people talk about how america is in certain collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreeme
specialist tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 will help you get started today. >>> look at shares of bank of america. 1015 is where it is trading right now. firmly above $10 mark. watch for a firm close above 10 and that will give them hope that perhaps they can stay and go higher at this point. watching the stock along with other bank stocks off of news from citigroup. citi laying off 11,000 people. >> starbucks card for the 1% has arrived. at least that is what some are calling the new $450 starbucks gift card made from steel. it comes loaded with 400 bucks, cost $50 to make and only 5,000 of them will be sold exclusively through luxury online retailer gilt.com and that sale starts friday in case you wanted to buy one. >> i think i probably will. >> really? >> 50 bucks to make a steel card? >> you get $400 worth of coffee. >> it cost $450. it cost $50 to make the card. >> can you get -- i assume you can get it replenished? >> that's a good question. >> if you want to use it again. >> i'll probably pass. steel card is heavy. >> i was thinking about how much it would weigh in your pocket. >> maybe by u.s.
destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and central america is now a star performer. first, we want to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is t
states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives. sir, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the us us house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on december 21, 2012, at 4:04 p.m. that the senate agreed to the conference report accompanying the bill, h.r. 4310. with best wishes i am signed sincerely, karen l. haas. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, when the house adjourns today it shall adjourn to meet at 20:00 p.m. on thursday, december 27, 2012. without objection, the committees may have until the end of the second session to file the final report pursuant to clause 1-b of rule 11, and the chair of the committee in consultation with its ranking ranking member before filing such report may update report to reflect committee or house action taken after the report was ordered reported o
silence except for the television. it is america's biggest problem. and on that cheerful note, thank you very much. [applause] >> next, and to raise with to retiring members of congress. dan burton of indiana talks about his 30 years in congress. followed by senator kent conrad on his 26-year career. and a discussion on corporations and stock values. dan burton is retiring from the house this year after 30 years in office. the 15-term congressman represents the fifth district in east central indiana which includes parts of indianapolis and the surrounding suburbs. earlier he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the collective demonstration and the oversight ruled congress. this is 30 minutes. as you exit the institution how would you say it stated? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. he had someone take his place and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we bec
in a financial crisis and ms. lagarde, who heals from tax the rich, 75% france is lecturing america, very interesting. >> meanwhile, european markets are down and because the italian prime minister mario monti m a surprise. is going to resign. and silvio berlusconi wants to replace him. europe is appalled. and people blaming the recession for not having more children. 64 births for one thousand women of child bearing age. half of the peak of the baby boom in the 1950's. our next guest has six children, counts them. and what's that-- >> and naham segal. that works. >> have i got that word? >> and light tte candles. >> if you light them i will come. >> you have six children. >> as do you. >> leave me out of this. >> and others people say they can't afford it you're saying it doesn't matter if you can afford them or not. >> if the price tag of having a child scares you the most, you haven't done the right gut test. stuart: so, go ahead and have the children whether you can afford them or not. >> having children is the investment in the future. if we don't have children now and understanding
, physical consistency. i will focus on bans of america and arguments can certainly be in other cases. i will argue the five most prominent arguments in favor of banning of a gurkha automating consistency in ways that favor majority practice -- the idea of equal respect for all people from which this spring as. all cases of what might turn to the christian tradition against itself called cases of seeing demoting your brother's eye while failing to appreciate the large plank in your own eyes, all target situations alleged to be present in muslim communities failing to note their ubiquity in the worst form in the majority culture. let's look at how each is treated with equal respect. first, is an argument that holds security requires people to show their face when appearing in public places. a second closely related argument which i will treat with that says that the argument of transparency, it says the kind of transparency and reciprocity proper to relations between citizens is impeded by covering part of the face. what is wrong with both of these arguments is they are applied totally in
. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, this i found, as a matter of fact, the engine in here is made in america. and not only are the engines in here made in america, but engines are made in america and are exported. the glass on this phone is made in kentucky. so we have been working for years on doing more and more in the united states, next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> you can see the entire interview with tim cook tonight on rock center, that's 10:00 eastern time on your local nbc station, but for now investors are watching the market. apple shares 5.31, which is close to the main lows. this is close to the next s support level on the stock and really catching a lot of people by surprise. >> it's a fiscal cliff decline. this is the greatest capital gains generator of our lifetime. i would love to see what the gains are going to be next year. but i would be saying you need to sell it. we have no idea where the capital gains are going to go, we're going to go over the fiscal cliff, what do you have to lose, the rates are go
newman on the november jobs report and a discussion about public health in america with national institute of allergy director. washington journal begins live each morning, 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care, and all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating, and you got to step back and ask, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? and of course, now we've got these reports saying, 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? when we step back 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures, this is something i think which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care name. by unaccountable" on c-span 2. >> writer institute. i think a writer's institute is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices, words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision thi
of america, merrill lynch recently held a 38% stake in hertz. after the offerings, the funds will hold a roughly 26% interest in the rental business. after the sales, hertz will not receive anything from the proceeds of the sale. coming up, squawk on the farm. we're going to talk crops, crops, crops, tractors and other equipment. and what it all tells us about the global economy. stay tuned. >> announcer: team, "squawk box" exclusive coverage of the "new york times" deal book conference. investing, the economy and the looming fiscal cliff. jpmorgan chairman and ceo jamie dimon, carl likely group co-founder david rubenstein and a lot more. it all starts tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. eastern. hi, i'm phil mickelson. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept, suppresses your immune s
us today. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert, the world on edge and the u.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments b
. >> america had a moment of silence for the victims of the newtown massacre. exactly one week ago, a young man armed with a semiautomatic rifle gunned down 20 people in connecticut. meanwhile, the national rifle association has taken a hard- nce on the issue, calling for armed security guards in yev american school to protect students. >> the gun owner's organizatitin has proposed the establishment of a national school shield program, saying a bad guy with a gun can only be stopped by a good guy with a gun. the head of the inner raymond it clear that the nra opposes new gun laws. pro-gun control activists twice disrupted the press conference in washington. russian president vladimir putin has made sharp comments about a european energy law, saying it causes confusion and undermined trust. russia is the biggest exporter of energy to europe. >> putin was speaking in brussels, where he has been holding talks with eu leaders. his first visit after he was reelected. although russia and the you are close trading partners, there are various contentious issues which divide them. >> vladimir putin did
in little america of the war within the war for afghanistan, washington post senior correspondent reports on the military and government failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gives him an editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it
didn't have enough in our operations, that we didn't have enough in asia and latin america, africa and the middle east and europe. some some of our clients have got 40%, 45%, 50% and they benefit as a result. the other part of it is i wish we had not just one-third of our operations in digital here on cnbc and that we had, let's say, 40%, 45% there, too. the pattern you'll see in 2013 is meets ya, application to our business and we specifically are going to get people to work more and more together in order to deliver more effective and efficient advertising and communications for our clients. >> if you have any regrets, share them with us here. >> never have regrets. >> learn from it. yeah. >> louisa will help you learn from it. e-mail your regrets into the show. we'll examine just where oil prices might be headed in 2013. >>> president obama calls congressional leaders to the white house today. >>> a lackluster trading week of the yurp, ewe european equity markets are scheduled to post double digit results for 2012. >> italy is expected to see solid demand when it sells up to 6 b
: well, father, i think america is in mourning and i think the mood is somber and reflective and we appreciate you being with us today, father jonathan morris and your message there, we appreciate it, sir. >> thank you. >> it's monday morning and training has just begun for the new week, where are we? up 33 points. and maybe speaker boehner making an offer about the fiscal cliff negotiations, maybe he's saying, look, you can tax pat a higher rate incomes over a million dollars a year and maybe that helps market sentiment? we're up 43 points in the very early going. to nicole, google shares are higher. what's this, another analyst raising a price target, is this what happened? >> we're doing the analyst morning for you. you know what? really, take aside what the number is. it just shows you what wall street is thinking. so, if you just take that message, that will give you a clear indication of which way the stocks may be going. so, in in case, ever core partners is looking there and raising the price target to $850 from 830 and they have an overweight rating and so, this basically i
? this is big news. >>> playing politics with america's fiscal future. >> we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. >> they would like to go beyond that or do it differently. >> but we're rising above it and putting your money first. guest host david walker of comeback america initiative and democratic strategist steve mcmahon both here to help us find solutions. >> then, what goldman's jim o'neill is so he seeing to help you prepare for your investments straight ahead. plus, adding opportunities door to door. >> have a good day. >> thank you. >>> domino's pizza ceo patrick doyle is here. the second hour of "squawk box" begins right now. >> good morning, everybody. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen. andrew is out this week. we've been watching futures this morning and they are indicated slightly higher. dow futures are up about 35 points above fair value, s&p futures and the fass dak futures are higher, as well. in your morning headlines today, the fiscal cliff dominating the sunday talk show circuit. treasury secretary tim geithner expressing on meet
. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." in this half hour, michigan is really doing it. the statehouse just passed a bill to make that union stronghold a right-to-work state. we are about to talk to governor rick snider object it. . >>> and has a recession already started? believe it or not, that's the forecast of lakshman achuthan. he says it started in july. we're going to press him on all that. >>> now, a movement started by american majority action called fire boehner has been trending on twitter. . but there's really not one wit of serious evidence that mr. boehner has any problems holding on to his speakership or even conservative leaders in the house. here now to try to make this weak case is ron meyer. ron, first of all, i want to say that i commend john boehner for his valiant attempts to stop the fiscal cliff and to make a deal without giving up growth principles. but when y
in history and we all know it on so many different fronts, he changed the way america thinks. and it's quite a gift that he had, that he gave to the country. so for both of them, it has been just an enormous privilege for all of us to serve with you. and i think everyone on both sides of the aisle know there was greatness in our delegation and that it was an honor, john and barney, to have been able to serve with you. and thank you so much. and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. burton: madam speaker, let me just follow up on what was just said and say that barney frank and i had a lot of differences over the years, but we also found times we could work together and we co-sponsored a bill together one time. barney and your colleague, i wish you both the very best and hopefully we will run into each other. let me make a couple of comments to my two colleagues who are going to follow me on this special order who told me if i talked too long they will hit me in the head with a ball bat. i want to say a couple of things. daniel inouye, senator inouye, i never met, but i read in the paper m
areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. you're watching "starting point." republicans have come out with their version of what a fiscal cliff solution
have ubs. more litigation heading over these guys. charles: bank of america is up like 100%. i am too afraid of these kind of thanks. i did not like the risk reward. i think there are a lot of on answered questions with what is brewing to meet the surface there. we have morgan stanley as a trade. i do like goldman sachs. i like the comparisons, more than anything else. listening, volume is down. also, we have regulations. at least we know what it is. lower margins because of price transparency. they admit they will lose revenue. all of that stuff is out there. connell: goldman had a settlement of its own on a different story. not love or talk up on on a financial crisis issue. charles: in part because most of the time they were using -- which was a fantastic sign for the stock. will that be a big story next year. charles: you just never know. that is one industry, for whatever reason, they never get a clean bill of health. there is always someone trying to beat the system. you don't think someone will try to figure out a way around basel three. if you configure in around within the ru
are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> president obama captured 55% of the women vote to win re-election. the national organization for women is pressing for the president to appoint women to have of his cabinet. they say there are plenty of qualified women to take those jobs. i'm joined by terry o'neil who is president of now. it's good to see you. >> good to see you. >> 22 cabinets currently in the obama administration, eight are female. 36%. we know that there will be a shakeup as there always is in a second term. why do you think the women -- the president needs to appoint more women? >> well, you know, the reality is study after study has shown that when women have a significant voice, whether it's a country or a state or a county or a town, that in fact what you see are more policies that actually help everyone. so more spending on education and health care lessen spendi
doctor who had an incredible things for america. to make a long story short, he sent general david petraeus and e-mail landon ten minutes got back to me and we had for the next three months general david petraeus, people basically had gone in and worked, the letters had been written to basically create a justification, an exception. three days ago he will be laid to rest in darlington. [applause] >> did dog company receive any proper recognition for what they did? >> i am so pleased many of the family and people that i know very personally are here. bob, you were a member of george company 3 one in the chosen reservoir. part of a book i wrote called give me tomorrow, you were a machine gunner and it is an honor to have you here. like george company, for the most part dog company hasn't received as much recognition as they deserve. they received a presidential citation for their actions at pointe du hoc, but hills 400 remains an open issue. they deserve a presidential citation for that action. they charged that hill and held against all odds. the last letter to tom, one of my main c
. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't know if you want swedish know, i mean, jefferson was wrong about the blacks because when they were freed, there was no general rebellion after 1895. there was no mass slaughter of former masters. jefferson throughout his life, the revolutionary war was, it was a bit of a shock to him because a number of slaves ran off and joined the british to get the freedom. and he never forgave him for that, and that overrode the loyalty that many more slaves adjourned to the american cause. it overrode the fact that, well first of i should mention, george washington integrated the american army in 1775 blogspot throughout the war in w
or the united states of america. mr. speaker, more jobs means that the impact of the weaker than forecast gdp on the public finances have been less than some might have expected. there have been three developments that have each had a significant one-off impact on the public finances, and in the report today we publish clearly and transparently the impacts of all three. first, there is the transfer of the royal mail pension fund to the public sector at part of its privatization. this produces a one-off reduction in the deficit of 28 billion pounds this year, but it adds to the deficit in the years afterwards. second, the previous goth had class -- government had classified northern rock asset management as off balance sheet. today it is brought on balance sheet in line with the office of national statistics. this adds about 70 billion pounds to our national debt and reminds us of the price the country is still paying for the failures of the past. third, the government as decided -- has decided, third, the government has decided with the agreement of the bank of england to transfer excess cash
comes back to us is the substituted compliance, as strict in london as it is in america? it's unusual that the crisis happens in london. mr. cooper, would you like to comment on it? and i will say in basel iii we're hearing from some of our financial institution that is the capital requirements are more onerous on american banks because american regulate, are going to enforce them and many competitors feel they will not enforce it. so this is a problem if someone can go, to another, have a different standard in what is competitive global market in the case of capital requirement requirements. have a situation that is disadvantage to american firms. i'm concerned about the threat to american taxpayers. you can say you have substituted compliance but how are you enforcing the substituted compliance? you hear from some financial institutions, won't say it publicly but don't feel it is regulated in certain places and i'm wondering is london one of them. why are so many financial crises in london? i would like to here from mr. cook. >> i think that will be a very important situation if sub
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